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Online campaign encourages Hong Kongers in Canada to recognize their identity in 2021 census

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The #IAmHongKonger campaign calls on members of the diaspora to select Hong Kong as their ethnic origin in the long-form census and to list Cantonese as one of their spoken languages at home in the short-form version.

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Palestinians beg government for expedited family reunification process

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You are hereHome Last month, UN secretary general António Guterres declared: “If there is a hell on earth, it is the lives of children in Gaza.” Thank you for reading this story… More people are reading rabble.ca than ever and unlike many news organizations, we have never put up a paywall – at rabble we’ve…

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Last month, UN secretary general António Guterres declared: “If there is a hell on earth, it is the lives of children in Gaza.”

Thank you for reading this story…

More people are reading rabble.ca than ever and unlike many news organizations, we have never put up a paywall – at rabble we’ve always believed in making our reporting and analysis free to all, while striving to make it sustainable as well. Media isn’t free to produce. rabble’s total budget is likely less than what big corporate media spend on photocopying (we kid you not!) and we do not have any major foundation, sponsor or angel investor. Our main supporters are people and organizations — like you. This is why we need your help. You are what keep us sustainable.

rabble.ca has staked its existence on you. We live or die on community support — your support! We get hundreds of thousands of visitors and we believe in them. We believe in you. We believe people will put in what they can for the greater good. We call that sustainable.

So what is the easy answer for us? Depend on a community of visitors who care passionately about media that amplifies the voices of people struggling for change and justice. It really is that simple. When the people who visit rabble care enough to contribute a bit then it works for everyone.

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Most parents believe e-learning failed kids during COVID-19 pandemic, Ipsos poll finds

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After two years of online learning, a new Ipsos poll suggests a majority of parents believe the system has failed their children during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that the disruptions to their education will have long-lasting impacts on their kids. The survey conducted exclusively for Global News asked 1,001 Canadian adults, including 229 parents of…

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After two years of online learning, a new Ipsos poll suggests a majority of parents believe the system has failed their children during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that the disruptions to their education will have long-lasting impacts on their kids.

The survey conducted exclusively for Global News asked 1,001 Canadian adults, including 229 parents of children aged four to 17, about the impacts of e-learning, and found that many are concerned about its effect on their kids.

Just 41 per cent of surveyed parents said e-learning had been good for their child’s education. Sixty per cent of parents agreed their child is behind in their education because of e-learning, while 67 per cent said they believed the learning disruptions will affect their child’s future opportunities.

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“It’s understandable that this was a pivot that was needed during pandemic times and at times of crisis,” said Lana Parker, an assistant professor at the Faculty of Education at the University of Windsor.

Parker said she doesn’t think online can replace in-person learning, “especially for the K-12 learning environment when students are young and developing a good many social, cognitive, affective attributes.”

She explained that the bulk of the way students learn is through the relationships they develop with their teachers, their classmates and then with the material, but “a lot of that” is lost in an online environment.

“No matter how excellent the online environment is, it’s very difficult to foster the sense of relationality or connection or relationship between and among students and the way that you would have an in-person classroom environment,” Parker said.

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More schools take learning online

More schools take learning online – May 18, 2021

According to the poll, 69 per cent of the parents also said their child’s mental health suffered as a result of e-learning, although Ipsos indicated that it will take “years to fully assess” the full impact of the pandemic on mental health.

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Parker said missing “hugely important non-formal learning interactions,” such as engaging in the arts and sports, as well as losing a social environment, can contribute poorly to a student’s well-being.

“I want to be optimistic because kids are incredibly resilient,” she said.

But “if you asked me my opinion, the area of most concern will be with respect to socialization, mental health and relationships rather than with some of the things that are more academically oriented.”

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Darrell Bricker, CEO of Ipsos Public Affairs, said he was surprised that the overwhelming number of respondents — 82 per cent — wanted in-person learning prioritized for the fall.

“It’s not like this has been a wonderful experiment,” said Bricker.

He said there is “obviously something that parents think is missing with their kids not being in school.”

“Which is why they say that their children have been harmed as a result of what we’ve gone through,” he continued. “Not in a minor way, but maybe even in a lasting way.”

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Ask an Expert: E-Learning for students amid COVID-19

Ask an Expert: E-Learning for students amid COVID-19 – Apr 5, 2020

Women more likely to want kids back to schoolSome Canadians were more eager to send their children back to school than others.

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Women were significantly more likely than men to “strongly agree” on the need to prioritize in-person learning at 45 per cent, as opposed to just 34 per cent of men.

Bricker said this is because women “disproportionately have the responsibility” to take care of children in families, despite many having careers of their own.

“They’re the ones who are most affected by what’s going on,” he said.

“Of the two parents — if there are two parents — they’re the ones who, with their lives disrupted, want to get back on a normal track.”

Household income was also a factor in determining whether respondents said e-learning should continue as a main method of education. Eighty-six per cent of respondents who earned at least $100,000 per year said they strongly agreed on the need for kids to get back to school, in contrast with 77 per cent of Canadians surveyed who earned less than $40,000 per year.

Meanwhile, 62 per cent of Canadians surveyed — including 63 per cent of parents — said kids should be back in the classrooms in the fall regardless of how Canada’s COVID-19 situation has evolved.

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But despite this, 75 per cent of total respondents as well as 75 per cent of parents said they believe that e-learning should still be considered an option for parents registering their kids for school in the fall.

Bricker said this posed an “interesting question.”

“There’s some element, but it’s a minority element of the parent population that actually thought e-learning was a good thing to do,” he said.

“Once people are not forced to be in an e-learning situation, how many of them actually want to see some form of a hybrid model or want to see their children being educated more remotely?”

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted between June 11 and 14, 2021, on behalf of Global News. For this survey, a sample of 1,001 Canadians aged 18-plus was interviewed online, including a subsample of 229 parents of children aged four to 17. Quotas and weighting were employed to ensure that the sample’s composition reflects that of the Canadian population according to census parameters. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within ± 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, had all Canadians aged 18-plus been polled. The credibility interval will be wider among subsets of the population. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to, coverage error and measurement error.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Friends recount Steven Rigby’s battles with mental health ahead of police shooting death

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Monday was day one of the inquest into the death of Steven Rigby. In December 2018, Rigby was killed in a police-involved shooting just outside Saskatoon. Friends described him as an intelligent man and good friend who had his demons to overcome, and who had been struggling with mental health and addictions. Shelly Martin was…

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Monday was day one of the inquest into the death of Steven Rigby.

In December 2018, Rigby was killed in a police-involved shooting just outside Saskatoon.

Friends described him as an intelligent man and good friend who had his demons to overcome, and who had been struggling with mental health and addictions.

Shelly Martin was a friend and coworker of Rigby in North Battleford. She said she noticed her friend becoming more withdrawn around June that year.

Rigby attempted suicide on three separate occasions, according to Martin, and was admitted to the Battlefords Union Hospital (BUH). Each time he was released.

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“How do you release somebody from the hospital with a prescription right after they tried to commit suicide?” she asked.

1:33
Government delays inquest into death of Steven Rigby

Government delays inquest into death of Steven Rigby – Jun 2, 2020

Martin said her friend wasn’t happy with a doctor at BUH who told him he wasn’t suicidal, just an alcoholic.

He refused to return to that doctor after another suicide attempt, Martin testified.

“He screamed at RCMP that if he had to talk to that doctor that he was going to kill himself,” she said.

Instead, she said she drove him to Saskatoon to get help.

Rigby’s mother said more should have been done to get her son help when he reached out.

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“That doctor said to him that he was just an alcoholic and he wasn’t suicidal even though he was making suicidal attempts,” Carey Rigby-Wilcox said.

“He was always telling me how he wasn’t getting the attention he felt he deserved.”

Const. Jordan Lapointe was a childhood friend of Rigby, and a member of the Saskatoon Police Service.

He said he, and Rigby’s other friends, tried to be supportive and help him manage his addictions and negative feelings.

He said for years Rigby joked to friends, including him, about dying in a police shoot-out.

‘He was absolutely terrified’On the night of Rigby’s death, Lapointe said he’d gotten several messages from friends to check up on him after receiving strange messages or phone calls that sounded like a goodbye.

Rigby’s mother, who was also worried, tracked his car to the Pike Lake area, Lapointe testified. She then called him “hysterical”, saying her son had fired two shots and was holding a gun to his head.

She called 911 and Lapointe informed police of the situation, then called Rigby, who picked up.

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Lapointe said he kept Rigby on the line, trying to calm him down as Saskatoon Police and RCMP arrived.

The call lasted nearly an hour and a half. About halfway through the call a crisis negotiating team showed up, Lapointe said, but Rigby became upset and refused to speak with anyone but him.

Instead, Lapointe kept his friend on the line while a negotiator wrote him notes on what to say to deescalate the situation.

During the standoff, Lapointe testified that Rigby sounded scared over the phone and flipped between small talk, apologizing and firing rounds out the window.

Lapointe said throughout the call Rigby began slurring his words. He could tell he was intoxicated and begged him to comply with police.

“I could tell he was absolutely terrified,” he said.

“I felt like I knew I was going to lose my best friend, and next thing I know I hear shots.”

Friends, family call for changeSaskatoon police shot Rigby three times; once in the arm, once in the thigh, and one in the abdomen.

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Dr. Jonathan Witt was the receiving physician at Royal University Hospital’s emergency department when Rigby was brought in.

He testified it was about 10 minutes before emergency personal could reach Rigby at the scene, by which point he had “no signs of life” or vitals when paramedics began lifesaving measures.

He was rushed to hospital, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy showed he died of blood loss, and had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.26, over double the provincial limit.

1:23
Virtual mental health consultations on the rise in Saskatchewan

Virtual mental health consultations on the rise in Saskatchewan – Jan 12, 2021

While on the stand, both Martin and Lapointe were asked what they would like to see change in Saskatchewan.

Both said Rigby should have been kept in hospital and given the help he needed, not sent away.

“How do you let somebody walk away from a place when they’re telling you what their intentions are?” Martin asked.

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“Hospitals don’t want to deal with addictions or people who struggle with mental health and addictions.”

Lapointe said he believes if his friend had been kept in hospital longer he might still be here today. He said Rigby had terrible experiences in Saskatchewan’s mental health system.

The night he died, while on the phone, Lapointe said Rigby told him, “If you take me to one of those f—— white rooms again I’m not coming with you,” while he tried to convince him to surrender to police.

The inquest is scheduled for the rest of this week.

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs help, please reach out. Resources are available. In case of an emergency, please call 911 for immediate help.

The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention, Depression Hurts and Kids Help Phone 1-800-668-6868 all offer ways of getting help if you, or someone you know, may be suffering from mental health issues.

1:48
Const. Patton remembered as exemplary friend, community member and police officer

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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