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CAP demands charges drop for La Ronge woman

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CAP says past incidents with RCMP mean Emily Kammermayer won’t receive a fair trial. Author of the article: Nick Pearce  •  Local Journalism Initiative An RCMP vehicle. (Saskatoon StarPhoenix). Photo by Zach Laing /Postmedia Network / Files The Congress of Aboriginal Peoples is calling for all charges against a La Ronge woman to be dropped.…

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CAP says past incidents with RCMP mean Emily Kammermayer won’t receive a fair trial.

Author of the article:

Nick Pearce  •  Local Journalism Initiative

An RCMP vehicle. (Saskatoon StarPhoenix). Photo by Zach Laing /Postmedia Network / Files The Congress of Aboriginal Peoples is calling for all charges against a La Ronge woman to be dropped.

CAP National Vice-Chief Kim Beaudin said Emily Kammermayer won’t receive a fair trial because of past interactions with RCMP, insisting her case should go into mediation.

“There is a history of neglect and bias from the RCMP in their interactions with Emily,” Beaudin said.

“These charges cannot be allowed to have merit given the transgressions in the handling of this case, and previous instances concerning Emily.”

Kammermayer, who is a member of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band, faces charges that include assault with a weapon, two counts of uttering threats, mischief, assaulting a police officer and two counts of obstructing a police officer.

Police arrested Kammermayer when she visited the La Ronge Health Centre on Dec. 29 with her two-year-old son. After a physician denied her son an X-ray, she and the doctor got into an argument and RCMP officers were called.

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As she left the centre, she alleges two RCMP officers assaulted her during the arrest. A third officer arrived and she was cuffed at the wrists and ankles and was allegedly told to “hop like a bunny” into the detachment’s detention area, she said.

Beaudin said this treatment happened because Kammermayer is Indigenous. Kammermayer has filed a complaint with the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission.

At a virtual news conference on Thursday, Kammermayer and Beaudin detailed two other incidents.

First, Kammermayer said one of the arresting officers was neglectful in a prior case involving her when she brought forward sexual assault allegations after a home invasion while she was in high school. The officer allegedly “failed to pursue the medical results necessary from the rape-kit” and didn’t fully investigate her case, a Thursday news release said.

Second, Kammermayer says RCMP went to her house without a warrant for her arrest in January. She alleges RCMP threatened to repeat the incident at the hospital if she didn’t come outside to talk. She also alleges RCMP searched her house without a warrant.

Kammermayer and Beaudin have also called for the release of her arrest recording.

The RCMP did not respond to a request for comment.

A spokeswoman for the attorney general declined to comment on a matter before the court, adding that any allegations will be addressed during the proceedings.

“The Crown pursues cases for which there is a reasonable likelihood of conviction and where it is in the public interest to proceed,” she wrote in a statement. “Those two things are re-examined at various stages.”

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Kammermayer is representing herself, has not yet entered a plea, and said she hasn’t received disclosure of the evidence. She is next due in court on Monday.

More On This Topic La Ronge woman alleges RCMP tackled her and knelt on her neck during arrest at health centre RCMP officer involved in Pelican Narrows arrests to be reassigned The news seems to be flying at us faster all the time. From COVID-19 updates to politics and crime and everything in between, it can be hard to keep up. With that in mind, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix has created an Afternoon Headlines newsletter that can be delivered daily to your inbox to help make sure you are up to date with the most vital news of the day. Click here to subscribe.

The Star Phoenix is part of the Local Journalism Initiative and reporters are funded by the Government of Canada to produce civic journalism for underserved communities. Learn more about the initiative

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Hashtag Trending, April 23, 2021 – SolarWinds name change; Signal hacks the cops; Canada’s scale-up challenges

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SolarWinds changes its name to N‑able, Signal’s CEO peels apart the cops’ favourite phone cracking tool; and Canada’s tech industry is desperate for talent. It’s all the tech news that’s popular right now. Welcome to Hashtag Trending! It’s Friday, April 23 and I’m your host Alex Coop. It looks like the SolarWinds brand was irreparably…

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SolarWinds changes its name to N‑able, Signal’s CEO peels apart the cops’ favourite phone cracking tool; and Canada’s tech industry is desperate for talent.

It’s all the tech news that’s popular right now. Welcome to Hashtag Trending! It’s Friday, April 23 and I’m your host Alex Coop.

It looks like the SolarWinds brand was irreparably damaged after thousands of users downloaded an infected software update last year, including several U.S. government departments. SolarWinds yesterday unveiled its new company name, N-able. “The name may sound familiar as N‑able extends the roots of who we are as a company,” the new company said in a statement on its website. Of course there’s no mention about the devastating supply chain attack which SolarWinds to this point hasn’t done much to quell fears that it won’t happen again. In February SolarWinds’ CEO even went as far as to blame an intern for the poor cybersecurity measures that were in place at the time of the compromise.

In a blog post published Wednesday, Signal CEO Moxie Marlinspike claimed that Cellebrite’s software has terrible security that can be easily manipulated in a number of ways. Cellebrite is an Israeli digital intelligence firm that sells software which can unlock phones and extract data. Very popular among law enforcement. Well, among his wild claims made, Marlinspike says that due to security flaws, someone could basically re-write all of the data being collected by Cellebrite’s tools. Hypothetically, a properly configured file could be slipped into any app on a targeted device. This would allow for the alteration of all of the data that has been or will be collected by Cellebrite’s software. Cellebrite provided Gizmodo a statement after the story about Signal’s testing went viral. The company says it’s committed to protecting the integrity of its customers’ data and that it relies on strict licensing policies that “govern how customers are permitted to use our technology …”

And lastly, tech companies, especially the ones in Canada trying to take that next leap from startup to scaleup, are having a hard time finding talent. There are oo many open roles, not enough qualified workers, The Globe and Mail reports. The tech sector has bounced back with employment in professional, scientific and technical services rising 6 per cent over the pandemic. The tech sector has fared well because workers were well-positioned to shift to remote work unlike those in other industries. But with competition so fierce for talent, some tech companies struggling to find available, experienced workers are hiking up their pay offers. Security roles are desperately sought after, despite the unemployment rate for the field hovering around 0 per cent.

That’s all the tech news that’s trending right now. Hashtag Trending is a part of the ITWC Podcast network. Add us to your Alexa Flash Briefing or your Google Home daily briefing. Make sure to sign up for our Daily IT Wire Newsletter to get all the news that matters directly in your inbox every day. Plus, catch episode one of Hashtag Trending in French, hosted by our own Catherine Morin from Quebec at DirectionInformatique.com. Episode 2 drops this weekend. I’m Alex Coop, thanks for listening!

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Profitable next moves for customer experience service providers – CMO Talks with Douglas Hayward

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‘Understanding’ is the watchword in new customer experience (CX) service models for Douglas Hayward, a research director responsible for IDC’s Worldwide Digital Strategy and Agency Services research stream. Hayward joined ITWC President Fawn Annan in April 2021 for an installment of CMO Talks, a podcast series produced by ITWC to address today’s marketing challenges. An…

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‘Understanding’ is the watchword in new customer experience (CX) service models for Douglas Hayward, a research director responsible for IDC’s Worldwide Digital Strategy and Agency Services research stream.

Hayward joined ITWC President Fawn Annan in April 2021 for an installment of CMO Talks, a podcast series produced by ITWC to address today’s marketing challenges. An expert on technology-enabled business transformation, he shared his thoughts on next moves for customer experience (CX) service providers.

Two CX Trends

Referencing an IDC report, Hayward described two predominant trends in the CX arena: a shift to commerce and a shift to heightened transparency. A third shift, he said, is geared towards purpose, a move that reflects the social unrest fomenting all over the world. “Demographic changes, job insecurity, unfairness in the economy, and a lack of trust in government all propel people towards wanting brands – and sometimes hero CEOs – to actually fix things for them,” he explained.

When asked by Annan to describe what key drivers mean for CX vendors, Hayward likened the new, borderless market to a double-edged sword. “Despite the obvious advantages, it creates fear and uncertainty for a lot of people,” he said, “and that comes at a time when, young people are being locked out of the housing markets and when taxes are set to rise because of COVID-19. It’s all very unsettling when those old fashioned, fixed linear careers disappear.”

Two CX Strategies

Commenting on two different CX strategies outlined in the IDC report, Hayward predicts an imminent move from defensive strategies – those intended to strengthen a firm – to offensive strategies that focus more on improving customer experience and creating new products and services. He sees this emphasis on growth as a great opportunity for both CMOs and CX vendors to design new products and services and make existing products and services more attractive to consumers.

Hayward isn’t surprised to see customer centricity now ranked as one of the top strategic business objectives. “It’s important to understand people, to empathize with them, and to understand their pain,” he said, “but you also have to do something useful. What’s important for CX services providers is to create ground level outcomes, using data, using technology, using process, change, culture change and so on. At the end of the day, if a relationship’s going to work between a service provider and a CMO, it has to produce tangible results.”

Transparency Rules

The next caveat is that whatever is done has to be honest. “Eco-washing is just going to backfire,” he said. “CX vendors and consultants can help you to define what you’re about. They can help you discover strengths you didn’t realize that you have, and they can help you to define your purpose. What they definitely can’t do is sell you a new purpose. People will see through that.”

IDC research shows that in order for customer experience services vendors and consultants to propose really great value adding technology or change processes, they need to know the organization inside out. In fact, one of Hayward’s key takeaways for the webinar is building the customer relationship. “Get to know the client’s culture and the organization and what are they capable of,” he advised. “Then get them to change that organization and change that culture, but do it subtly, in alignment with their purpose and identity. Give them a strategy, but stay pragmatic.”

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Hashtag Trending, April 22, 2021 – Doug Ford’s BlackBerry; Apple’s Spring Loaded event; TikTok sued for billions

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It’s all the tech news that’s popular right now. Welcome to Hashtag Trending! It’s Wednesday, April 22 and I’m your host Baneet Braich.  Premier Doug Ford is still rocking a BlackBerry Classic phone for calls, texts, emails. According to The Toronto Star, it’s his go-to phone. The publication covered some of the technical challenges Ford…

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It’s all the tech news that’s popular right now. Welcome to Hashtag Trending! It’s Wednesday, April 22 and I’m your host Baneet Braich. 

Premier Doug Ford is still rocking a BlackBerry Classic phone for calls, texts, emails. According to The Toronto Star, it’s his go-to phone. The publication covered some of the technical challenges Ford is facing at his late mother’s house where he is isolating after an aide tested positive for COVID-19. Although Ford is reportedly accustomed to remote meetings via Zoom and Microsoft teams from his office at Queen’s Park, he is lacking the same technical support in isolation. His current BlackBerry model can’t download attachments or run many tasks easily. The phone’s last software update was in 2018, so we hope it’s not being used to receive or send anything super important. [Twitter]

Apple’s recent Spring Loaded unveiled the new iPad Pros featuring the company’s super-charged M1 chip and an update to its 4K TV. Another product called AirTag uses a network on iPhones to find lost products. The tech giant also announced credit-sharing options for teenagers on the Apple Card and new colour options such as a purple iPhone 12. The new iMacs will also have seven colour options. For the avid podcast listeners, Apple is creating a subscription service to compete with competitors like Spotify which is set to overtake Apple in terms of U.S. podcast listeners this year.

TikTok sued for collecting children’s data in Britain, Europe from technology

And lastly, TikTok has been sued for collecting children’s data in Britain and Europe. The former Children’s Commissioner for Britain has filed a lawsuit against TikTok for allegedly collecting the personal information of millions of children using the app. The suit is seeking more than 1 billion in damages from TikTok and its parent company, ByteDance. The previous commissioner is accusing TikTok of being a data collection service thinly veiled as a social media network. In a statement she said, “We want to put a stop to TikTok’s shadowy data collection practices.” A TikTok spokesperson says the case lacks merit and that they intend to “vigorously defend the action.”

That’s all the tech news that’s trending right now. Hashtag Trending is a part of the ITWC Podcast network. Add us to your Alexa Flash Briefing or your Google Home daily briefing. Make sure to sign up for our Daily IT Wire Newsletter to get all the news that matters directly in your inbox every day. Plus, catch episode one of Hashtag Trending in French, hosted by our own Catherine Morin from Quebec at DirectionInformatique.com. Episode 2 drops this weekend. I’m Baneet Braich, thanks for listening!

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